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Disinformation: fake news, propaganda & more: Fact Checking Sites

Sites and Tools for Fact Checking

truth-o-meter. Needle pointing at False with Caution at High Volts text at bottom of meter

Image Source: Columbia Journalism Review

Snopes.com : This highly regarded rumor analyzing site has been researching rumors since 1995.

Politifact.com : PolitiFact staffers research statements and rate their accuracy on the Truth-O-Meter, from True to False. The most ridiculous falsehoods get the lowest rating, Pants on Fire.

Media Bias Fact Check: independent online media outlet dedicated to educating the public on media bias and deceptive news practices.

Real or Satire: Homepage search box allows users to check if a URL is a satirical site.

FactCheck.org: nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics. Monitors the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews and news releases. 

All Sides: Not exactly a fact-checking site but it strives to present perspectives from "all sides" of an issue.

Washington Post Fact Checker: Focused mainly on political news but contains plenty of in-depth analysis and extensive cross-checking.

Lead Stories: As they say on their website, "Lead Stories is a U.S. based fact checking website that is always looking for the latest false, misleading, deceptive or inaccurate stories, videos or images going viral on the internet."

In the News...

Confirmation Bias

confirmation bias venn diagram

Facts and evidence

Evidence we ignore

Our beliefs

Overlap area: Evidence we believe

confirmation bias definition

Confirmation Bias

Is the tendency to search for, interpret and recall information in a way that supports what we already believe.

Image Source: Newslit.org

Confirmation Bias Explained

Confirmation bias in the utilization of others' opinion strength, (Nature neuroscience, 2020-01, Vol.23 (1), p.130-137)

How Good are You at Spotting Fake News?

Play this game to see how well you evaluate the news.

Facticious

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